Phone Support- 070018908



Матура по английски език - Май 2009 г., избираем вариант - текстове

Изтегли в pdf формат >>

ДЪРЖАВЕН ЗРЕЛОСТЕН ИЗПИТ ПО АНГЛИЙСКИ ЕЗИК – 30 МАЙ 2009Г.

 

ВАРИАНТ 1

 

PART ONE: LISTENING COMPREHENSION

 

Directions: You will hear the text Tiffany's Cookies twice. Before you listen to it, you have 1 minute to read the questions. While listening for the first time, you can look at the questions and the suggested choices, but you are not allowed to take notes. When you hear the whole text, you have 5 minutes to answer the questions on your answer sheet, choosing among A, B or C. Then you will hear the text again and will have 1 minute to check your answers.

 

Tiffany's Cookies

 

Tiffany started baking cookies when she was in fifth grade. By the time she reached seventh grade, her cookies were locally famous. Every week her relatives and friends begged her to make her famous chocolate chip cookies for them.

Then one day a local reporter wrote a story about her and her famous cookies. The story was later picked up by National Television news. The story was about the many different recipes Tiffany could make and how tasty her cookies were. Upon seeing the story, the National TV Coco Cookie Company called Tiffany to see if she would sell them her famous cookie recipe.

Tiffany sold them her oatmeal raisin recipe for twenty thousand dollars and her pudding cookie recipe for fifty thousand dollars, but she refused to sell them her chocolate chip recipe. She decided to keep this recipe and start her own company. In August 2002, she started Tiffany Boom Cookies Incorporated.

 

Directions: You will hear a text about clocks twice. Before you listen to it, you have 1 minute to read the questions. While listening for the first time, you can look at the questions and the suggested choices, but you are not allowed to take notes. When you hear the whole text, you have 5 minutes to answer the questions on your answer sheet, choosing among A, B or C. Then you will hear the text again and will have 1 minute to check your answers.

 

The atomic clock is the world's most accurate timepiece, largely because it is made entirely by machines. Yet people are still obsessed by handcrafted clocks and watches even when they are less reliable and far more expensive. Why so?

Mankind has always lived according to natural rhythms - seasonal or biological - but strict universal timekeeping is a relatively recent notion. People first told the time using a tall stick, stuck into the ground. It was not very reliable. The water clock and the sand glass, which grew out of the observation that time and motion are inseparable, worked better. But nothing has proved as accurate as the atomic clock, which breaks time down into nine billion vibrations a second. In fact, physicists point out that the atomic clock is so accurate that it needs occasionally to be recalibrated to take account of fluctuations in the earth's rotation.

Nowadays the electronic quartz watch would make timekeeping cheap, dependable and above all effortless. Perhaps this is why some people seek out watches that still demand at least some participation by the owner. The appeal of the mechanical wind-up clock is that it is actually living.

 

Directions: You will hear a text about climate change twice. Before you listen to it, you have 2 minutes to read the questions. While listening for the first time, you can look at the questions and the suggested choices, but you are not allowed to take notes. When you hear the -whole text, you have 5 minutes to answer the questions on your answer sheet, choosing among A, B, C or D. Then you will hear the text again and will have 1 minute to check your answers

 

The recovery of the earth's climate from the last little Ice Age started about 200 years ago, but the concentration of the atmospheric carbon dioxide started to increase significantly as late as in the 1950s, probably due to rapidly increased burning of fossil fuels.

The climate recovery is still an ongoing process today. Thus, for example, a rapid warming in the 1930s was followed by a cooling period, and recently again warming until about 1998. Surprisingly, after 1995 both satellite and ground sources have shown the same temperature measurements.

According to the UK climate commission, this last warming period has been forced by increased carbon dioxide concentration in the atmosphere. There is however no proof of that. The theory of how carbon dioxide influences the global temperature is complicated and unreliable. And if the global temperature again starts to increase slower than the natural long-term trend of 0.5 degrees C for 100 years, or even starts to cool, we can be quite certain that the recent faster warming trends have been natural.

A good reason to start a diagram from 1995 is that since that year no big volcano eruptions have disturbed the temperature trend. Contrary to common belief, there has been no or little global warming since 1995 and this is shown by two completely independent datasets.

Anyway, it is impossible to say what is going to happen in the future. But so far, real measurements give no ground for concern about a catastrophic future warming.