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Матура по английски език - Юни 2008 г., избираем вариант

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PART ONE: LISTENING COMPREHENSION

 

Directions: You will hear the text Memoirs of a survivor twice. Before you listen to it, you have 3 minutes to read the questions. While listening for the first time, you can look at the questions and the suggested choices, but you are not allowed to take notes. When you hear the whole text, you have 8 minutes to answer the questions on your answer sheet, choosing among A, B, C or D. Then you will hear the text again and will have 2 minutes to check your answers.

 

1. To modern man running water, electricity, heat and plumbing are

A) a must.

B)  a means of survival.

C)  basics.

D) a means of adaptation.

 

2. The narrator's bunker

A) had a waterproof roof.

B)  was wet and poorly lit.

C)  was full of rats and snakes.

D) had some basic conveniences.

 

3. The Bamboo Viper

A) is among the most poisonous snakes.

B)  had been laying an ambush for Pete.

C)  is one of the most widespread snakes.

D) had been carefully avoiding Pete.

 

4. The food that the narrator and his guys ate

A) didn't taste like real food.

B)  was a technological innovation.

C)  was fresh and tasty.

D) was varied and nutritious.

 

5. On his return to the States, the narrator

A) had lost nearly 70 kilos.

B)  had returned to his normal weight.

C)  felt fit and in good health.

D) looked starved and miserable.

 

6. The narrator and his guys were

A) explorers.

B)  adventurers.

C)  hunters.

D) soldiers.

 

Directions: You will hear a story about The Beatles twice. Before you listen to it, you have 2 minutes to read the questions. While listening for the first time, you can look at the questions and the suggested choices, but you are not allowed to take notes. When you hear the whole text, you have 6 minutes to answer the questions on your answer sheet, choosing among A, B, or C. Then you will hear the text again and will have 1 minute to check your answers.

 

7. The Beatles' 1966 tour began in Tokyo.

A) True.

B)  False.

C)  No information in the text.

 

8. The Japanese were crazy about the Beatles.

A)  True.

B)  False.

C)  No information in the text.

 

9. In the Philippines, the band felt things were going wrong.

A)  True.

B)  False.

C)  No information in the text.

 

10. The Beatles did not go to Imelda Marcos's party because they did not approve of her husband's government.

A)  True.

B)  False.

C)  No information in the text.

 

11. Just before boarding the plane the band's manager was asked to pay back all the money from the concert.

A)  True.

B)  False.

C)  No information in the text.

 

Directions: You will hear a story about Dolphins twice. Before you listen to it, you have 2 minutes to read the questions. While listening for the first time, you can look at the questions and the suggested choices, but you are not allowed to take notes. When you hear the whole text, you have 5 minutes to answer the questions on your answer sheet, choosing among A, B, or C. Then you will hear the text again and will have 1 minute to check your answers.

 

12. Dolphins can remember details of their own appearance.

A)    True.

B)    False.

C)    No information in the text.

 

13. Dolphins and chimps share some peculiar abilities.

A) True.

B)  False.

C)  No information in the text.

 

14. In the trials scientists put different black marks on the mirror.

A) True.

B)  False.

C)  No information in the text.

 

15. Behavioural habits of animals may influence their mental abilities.

A) True.

B)  False.

C)  No information in the text.

 

PART TWO: READING COMPREHENSION

 

Directions: Read the text below. Then read the questions that follow it and choose the best answer to each question correspondingly among A, B or C, marking the answer on your answer sheet.

 

BRITAIN'S FUNNIEST CITIES

Part One

 

The British are famous for their sense of humour, but we don't just rely on professional comedians to make us laugh. All of us use humour in daily life - joking about a nasty boss, telling tall tales to children or teasing friends in the pub. But are some parts of the country funnier than others?

To find out we sent a team of researchers to eight cities round the country, stopping 50 passers-by in each one and challenging them to tell a joke or a funny story, sing a silly song, do a silly dance - whatever it took to make us laugh. One point was awarded for every victim who accepted the challenge, giving each city a score out of 50. Then each researcher gave marks for how funny they thought the end result was. The average for the whole city was calculated to give a further mark out of 50 and a potential total of 100. Here is what we discovered.

 

16. There are a lot of professional comedians in Britain.

A)   True.

B)    False.

C)    No information in the text.

 

17. A team of researchers interviewed 400 passers-by to check their sense of humour.

A)   True.

B)    False.

C)    No information in the text.

 

18. The passers-by were asked to behave in a stupid way.

A)   True.

B)    False.

C)    No information in the text.

 

19. Each person who agreed to perform contributed one point to the total score of the city.

A)   True.

B)    False.

C)    No information in the text.

 

20. The maximum score for each city was 50 points.

A)   True.

B)    False.

C)    No information in the text.

 

Directions: Read the continuation of the text below. Then read the questions that follow it and choose the best answer to each question correspondingly among A, B, C or D, marking the answer on your answer sheet.

 

BRITAIN'S FUNNIEST CITIES

Part Two

 

Bristol, in the south-west, has never been seen as a hotbed of comedy. Yet its residents ranked comfortably as the funniest in the country. A massive 72 percent of the people we approached were willing to try to make us laugh and our score for their efforts, 68 points in all, was well above the national average.

Around the country people told us that London would fare badly in our tests. "Too stressed," was one common comment. "Too much into making money," was another. But the capital's cosmopolitan population produced some of the most diverse and highest-quality comedy we met and scored a neat 52. In truth, many Londoners did rush by when we approached, claiming to be too busy to talk. But the city's fast pace of life also inspires humour.

The funniest man whom our researchers talked to in their travels, 3 3-year-old Mark Langley, had grown up in Liverpool with a chronically ill mother and a disabled father. His hometown beat London to third place by one point.

The people of Brighton were altogether less jovial, ranking second from bottom in our tests. On a rain-soaked day a gloomy air seemed to hang over the seaside resort, despite its being famous for its nightlife and youthful alternative lifestyle.

 

21. Bristol was the city which won

A)   72 percent.

B)    the first place.

C)    68 percent.

D)   72 points.

 

22. Londoners fared quite well

A)   in spite of the expectations.

B)    because they wanted to make money.

C)    because of the fast pace of life.

D)   in spite of the cosmopolitan population.

 

23. With its 52 points London ranked

A)   third.

B)    fourth.

C)    fifth.

D)   last but one.

 

24. The citizens of Liverpool managed to score

A)    53 points.

B)    52 points.

C)    51 points.

D)    50 points.

 

25. The people of Brighton ranked rather low in the tests most probably because

A)   Brighton is a seaside resort.

B)    of the alternative lifestyles of the young people there.

C)    they live mainly at night.

D)   of the bad weather on that particular day.

 

Directions: Read the final part of the text below. Then read the questions that follow it and choose the best answer to each question correspondingly among A, B, C or D, marking the answer on your answer sheet.

 

BRITAIN'S FUNNIEST CITIES

Part Three

 

Among the fairly reserved Glasgow population there were flashes of wit. All too often people were quick to praise the Glaswegian talent for observational humour, but slow to come up with any material themselves. They scored 48 points and ranked immediately after Londoners. Glasgow did claim one comedy title, however - the person determined to do anything for a laugh.

Another city where local expectation didn't match up to reality was Newcastle. The people we stopped were warm and many desperately tried to think of something funny to say but less than a third managed it. That brought them the sixth place with 45 points in all.

In Birmingham humour came from the most unexpected sources, helping it to second overall in our rankings with a total of 59 points.

"Not many people will make you laugh round here," a plump woman in her thirties pushing a pram informed our researchers outside a clothes shop in Cardiff. "People take life too seriously and they are too reserved." She wasn't wrong. Only 11 out of 50 people made an attempt at comedy in the Welsh capital and it ranked a distant last in our tests with only 29 points.

The funniest age groups were the under-20s and the over-70s.

When you average all the ratings given by the researchers, Britain scores six out of ten. Given that everyone was caught by surprise as they tried to take their lunch break or go shopping, often in wind or rain, that's a result to be proud of.

 

26. The Glaswegians failed to show

A)   any flash of wit.

B)    their sense of spontaneous humour.

C)    their talent for observation.

D)   their determination.

 

27. Few people in Newcastle were

A) warm.

B)  desperate.

C)  funny.

D) cooperative.

 

28. Which of he following statements about Birmingham is NOT true?

A)   It ranked second after Bristol.

B)    No one expected to meet funny people there.

C)    It ranked second from bottom.

D)   Its citizens proved quite witty.

 

29. The researchers met the greatest enthusiast to entertain them in

A)   Birmingham.

B)    Liverpool.

C)    Newcastle.

D)   Glasgow.

 

30. The researchers find the results satisfactory, bearing in mind that

A)   the interviewed people were in a hurry.

B)    the interviewed people were unprepared.

C)    the weather was sometimes bad.

D)   All of the above.

 

PART THREE: USE OF ENGLISH

 

Section One: Cloze Test

 

Directions: Read the text and for each numbered gap choose the letter (A, B, C or D) of the word or phrase that best suits each space. Then enter your answer on your answer sheet.

 

DOING TIME, MAKING STEAK

 

Italy has long been famous (31) ………… its exclusive restaurants, but this time it has excelled itself, according to a (32) …………in The Daily Telegraph.

The (33) …………fashionable eating place in the home of (34) …………is located inside the Fortezza Medicea high-security prison at Volterra, near Pisa, and is (35) ………… by robbers, murderers and (36) …………Mafiosi.

Under the watchful (37) ………… of armed guards in the otherwise charming setting of a once beautiful chapel, members of the (38) ………… can enjoy the £17-a-head set menu, while being serenaded by Bruno, a pianist (39) ………… life sentence for murder.

Chef Egidio, 50, another lifer, (40) ………… his work seriously"I like to be sure that (41) ………… enjoy the food with the same passion that I prepare it," he said. "I haven't had any (42) ………… ,” he adds, unsurprisingly.

“The fact that the (43) ………… are prepared by criminals doesn't really (44) ………… me,” one customer commented. “Though I might be worried if someone had been (45) …………of poisoning."

 

31. A) with

 

32. A) report

 

33. A) last

 

34. A) paste

 

35. A) commanded

 

36. A) past

 

37. A) eye

 

38. A) auditorium

 

39. A) making

 

40. A) takes

 

41. A) peoples

 

42. A) complains

 

43. A) servings

 

44. A) annoy

 

45. A) convicted

B)for

 

B) notice

 

B) late

 

B) pasta

 

B) directed

 

B) former

 

B) look

 

B) auditory

 

B) doing

 

B) gets

 

B) users

 

B) complaints

 

B) portions

 

B) mind to

 

B) sentenced

C)by

 

C) show

 

C) later

 

C) pasty

 

C) governed

 

C) previous

 

C) care

 

C) public

 

C) suffering

 

C) bears

 

C) diners

 

C) complexities

 

C) dishes

 

C) excite

 

C) blamed

D)in

 

D) remark

 

D) latest

 

D) pastry

 

D)run

 

D) formal

 

D) attention

 

D) publicity

 

D) lying

 

D) stands

 

D) dinners

 

D) complexes

 

D) plates

 

D) bother

 

D) charged

 

Section Two: Sentence Completion

 

Directions: Read the dialogue and for each of the numbered gaps below, choose the letter (A, B, C or D) of the word or phrase that best completes its meaning. Then enter your answer on your answer sheet..

 

A: How do you do, my dear Ernest? What brings you up to town?

B: Oh, pleasure, pleasure! (46) ………… should bring one anywhere? Eating (47) ………… , I see!

A: I believe it is customary in good society to take some slight refreshment at five o’clock.

B: Yes, of course. But hullo! Why all these cups? Why cucumber sandwiches? Why such extravagance in (48) ………… young person? Who is coming to tea?

A: Oh, just Aunt Augusta and Gwendolen; but I’m afraid Aunt Augusta won’t quite approve of your being here. The way you flirt with Gwendolen is perfectly shameless. It is almost (49) ………… the way Gwendolen flirts with you. Please don’t touch the cucumber sandwiches! They are ordered specially for Aunt Augusta.

B: Well, you have been eating them all the time.

A: That is (50) ………… different matter. She is my aunt.

 

46. A) What other

 

47. A) as usual

 

48. A) such a

 

49. A) worst than

 

50. A) a quite

B) What another

 

B) as usually

 

B) a so

 

B) so badly as

 

B) quite

C) What else

 

C) like usual

 

C) a such

 

C) as worse as

 

C) too

D) What different

 

D) like usually

 

D) a too

 

D) as bad as

 

D)aso

 

Section Four: Sentence Transformations

 

Directions: On your sheet for open-ended answers complete the second sentence so that it is as close as possible in meaning to the first one.

 

51. People have often asked themselves: "Does it pay to do good?"

People have often asked themselves if ……………………………………

 

52. Although it was snowing heavily, Mrs Pumpkin went out for her usual evening walk.

In spite…………………………………….

 

53. Mrs Simmons entered the nursery and found everything in a terrible mess.

Mrs Simmons entered the nursery and found that the children ……………………………………

 

54. Unless you tease the dog he will not bark at you.

If ……………………………………

 

55. Shall we invite all your classmates to your birthday party?

How ……………………………………?

 

56. Kevin hasn't spoken to his brother since my birthday party when they quarrelled about that Murdoch girl.

Kevin last ……………………………………

 

57. "Why don't you come with us, Jane? We have one more seat in the car," said Martha.

Martha offered ……………………………………

 

58. We will give excellent marks only to the students who have attended lectures regularly.

Only the students …………………………………….

 

59.1 am very sorry that I didn't come with you to that concert on Saturday.

I regret ……………………………………

 

60. Usually boys don't care so much about their appearance as girls.

Girls care ……………………………………

 

PART FOUR WRITING

 

Directions: On your sheet for open-ended answers write a composition of about 140-170 words on ONE of the following topics:

 

1.      What do you do when you are in a hurry and a stranger stops you in the street with the words: "Excuse me, would you... "?

 

2.      Describe your most precious "possession" - a person, a pet, an object, a place, a memory etc. Explain why it is so valuable to you.