Phone Support- 070018908



Матура по английски език - Юни 2008 г. - текстове

Изтегли в pdf формат >>

ДЪРЖАВЕН ЗРЕЛОСТЕН ИЗПИТ ПО АНГЛИЙСКИ ЕЗИК

 

3 юни 2008 г.

 

ВАРИАНТ 2

 

TRANSCRIPTS

 

PART ONE

 

LISTENING COMPREHENSION

 

Text I

 

Directions: You will read a text about molly dancing twice. Before you read it, give the students 3 minutes to read the questions. While they listen to the text for the first time, they may look at the questions and the suggested choices, but are not allowed to take notes. When they hear the whole text, they have 8 minutes to answer the questions on their answer sheets, choosing among A, B, C or D. Then read the text again and give them 2 minutes to check their answers.

 

Molly dancing is a traditional form of English folk dancing - but it's not something you see everywhere in England. It used to be done in the Fens about two hundred years ago. At that time, villages in the Fens were very isolated -just one or two houses at the end of a long road. A fen is a piece of very flat, wet ground. What we call "the Fens" is a large area in the East of England. In the past, a great part of this area would flood every year, and the villages and towns would become like little islands. This explains the isolation of the Fens.

Today, the Fens are no longer isolated, but because of their history, they have kept a very strong sense of identity and tradition.

But although molly dancing is a tradition in the Fens, the dancers aren't content to simply carry on doing things the way they've always been done. They decided that if molly dancing was going to work for the twenty-first century, it needed to consist of more interesting dances, more interesting appearance and an emphasis on entertainment so that people go away from the dance, thinking "Wow! We enjoyed that!" Well, their appearance is certainly very amusing. With their heavy make-up, big wigs and striking black and white clothes, they look more like heavy metal rock stars than folk dancers!

Tony Forster, the boss of the dancing group, explains why they decided to wear black and white costumes. When the members of the group were researching molly dancing, they looked at photographs of old molly dancers a hundred years ago. They could only find one thing that all the old dancers had in common, which was that they were all in black and white. So they thought, "Well, that's obviously the way to go."

Today Tony Forster's group keeps on presenting their dances with vigour, enthusiasm, enjoyment and confidence to which the audience will respond. And it certainly does.

 

Text II

 

Directions: You will read the text Asking for Trouble twice. Before you read it, give the students 2 minutes to read the questions. While they listen to the text for the first time, they may look at the questions and the suggested choices, but are not allowed to take notes. When they hear the whole text, they have 6 minutes to answer the questions on their answer sheets, choosing among A, B or C. Then read the text again and give them 1 minute to check their answers.

 

It must have been about two in the morning when I returned home. I tried to wake up my wife by ringing the door-bell, but she was fast asleep, so I got a ladder from the shed in the garden, put it against the wall, and began climbing towards the bedroom window. I was almost there when a sarcastic voice below said; 'I don't think the windows need cleaning at this time of the night.' I looked down and nearly fell off the ladder when I saw a policeman. I immediately regretted answering in the way I did, but I said, 'I enjoy cleaning windows at night.'

'So do I,' answered the policeman in the same tone. 'Excuse my interrupting you. I hate to interrupt a man when he is busy working, but would you mind coming with me to the station?'

'Well, I'd prefer to stay here,' I said. 'You see, I've forgotten my key.'

'Your what?' he called.

'My key,' I shouted.

Fortunately, the shouting woke up my wife who opened the window just as the policeman had started to climb towards me.

 

Text III

 

Directions: You will read a text about birdwatching twice. Before you read it, give the students 2 minutes to read the questions. While they listen to the text for the first time, they may look at the questions and the suggested choices, but are not allowed to take notes. When they hear the whole text, they have 5 minutes to answer the questions on their answer sheets, choosing among A, B or C. Then read the text again and give them 1 minute to check their answers.

 

Welcome to the Natural History Museum's weekly science lecture series. I'll begin today's presentation on ornithology by giving you some tips on birdwatching. How can you learn to identify birds? The answer is, by looking at important general features, then moving to specific ones. The first thing to look at is size. Although it's difficult to know a bird's size in inches, you should try to get an idea of it by comparing it to birds you know, such as a sparrow, robin, or crow. Shape is the next thing to look at. Most experts can name birds by shape alone. Areas to study are the shape of the body, head, tail, legs, and bill. Ask yourself: Is the body slim or wide? Are the neck and legs long or short? Is the tail short, medium, or long? Is it forked at the tip, square-ended, or pointed? Notice the size and shape of the bill. Color and pattern are the next areas to study. Look for stripes, spots, or other markings on the breast, back, wings, and tail. Finally, voice is the most useful way to identify birds. Listen and make note of any songs or calls you hear. Later I'll play several recordings that will help you learn to know birds by their sounds.